Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary

Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary was released in 2014. It contains a translation of the poem Beowulf (dating back more than a 100 years) from Old English to Modern English together with an extensive commentary. J.R.R. Tolkien wrote the translation in 1920-1926, but was not published until the son Christopher edited this volume. It also contains Sellic Spell and two versions of The Lay of Beowulf.

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The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, XV: The Sea-Bell

This story features a person who travels out to sea and is gone over a year in a mysterious land, which changes them as a person. It could be associated with the type of despair and darkness that is felt by people who have taken to the "wandering-madness" (p.258) which is a perspective of the Hobbits, making them "queer and uncommunicable" (p.258). This poem is a a revised and expanded version of Looney, which was published in the Oxford Magazine in 1934.

The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, XII: Cat

The poem "Cat" was intended as being a poem in the marginalia in the Red Book, a piece written by Sam Gamgee as a touched-up version of an older piece of "comic bestiary lore of which Hobbits appear to have been fond" (The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, p. 232). It is a fairly short poem so I have quoted it below in it's entirety instead of writing a summary of it which would be only one sentence short.

The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, IX: The Mewlips

This poem depicts nightmarish creatures called Mewlips and the depressing route  one takes to their dwelling and what happens when you reach it. There exsists a precursor to The Mewlips, it is called Knocking at the Door: Lines Induced by Sensations When Waiting for an Answer at the Door of an Exalted Academic Person. Tolkien published that one under a pseudonym in Oxford Magazine (1937).

Tolkien week: Day 3 – Middle-earth Questionaire

Since I saw that fellow blogger James at A Tolkienist's Perspective had answered these questions put forward by this blog, I decided to have a go at answering them as well! 1.  What draws you to Tolkien's stories?  (The characters, the quests, the themes, the worlds, etc.) What caught me the first readings is the … Continue reading Tolkien week: Day 3 – Middle-earth Questionaire